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George A. Akerlof

Definition

George Arthur Akerlof is an American economist who is a University Professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University and Koshland Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He won the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

What is 'George A. Akerlof'

A winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, along with Michael Spence and Joseph Stiglitz, for his theory of information asymmetry as expressed in his famous 1970 paper, "The Market for Lemons," which discusses imperfect information in the market for used cars. He is also well known for his efficiency wage hypothesis, which suggests that wages are determined by the efficiency goals of employers in addition to supply and demand forces.

Explaining 'George A. Akerlof'

Akerlof is an economics professor at the University of California at Berkeley; he also taught briefly at the London School of Economics. He was born in Connecticut in 1940 and earned his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Akerlof's research focuses on macroeconomics, monetary theory and behavioral economics.


Further Reading


Looting: the economic underworld of bankruptcy for profit
www.jstor.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

Identity and the Economics of OrganizationsIdentity and the Economics of Organizations
www.aeaweb.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

The market for “lemons”: Quality uncertainty and the market mechanismThe market for “lemons”: Quality uncertainty and the market mechanism
www.sciencedirect.com [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

Behavioral macroeconomics and macroeconomic behaviorBehavioral macroeconomics and macroeconomic behavior
pubs.aeaweb.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

The missing motivation in macroeconomicsThe missing motivation in macroeconomics
pubs.aeaweb.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

Sins of Omission and the Practice of EconomicsSins of Omission and the Practice of Economics
www.aeaweb.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …

Identity, supervision, and work groupsIdentity, supervision, and work groups
pubs.aeaweb.org [PDF]
Why the free-market system encourages so much trickery even as it creates so much good Ever since Adam Smith, the central teaching of economics has been that free markets provide us with material well-being, as if by an invisible hand. In Phishing for Phools, Nobel …


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