BROWSE

Gary S. Becker

Definition

Gary Stanley Becker was an American economist and empiricist. He was a professor of economics and sociology at the University of Chicago. Described as "the most important social scientist in the past 50 years" by The New York Times, Becker was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1992 and received the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007. A 2011 survey of economics professors named Becker their favorite living economist over the age of 60, followed by Ken Arrow and Robert Solow.

What is 'Gary S. Becker'

An American economist who won the 1992 Nobel Prize in Economics for his microeconomic analysis of human behavior and interaction. Before Becker, human behavior was primarily analyzed within the framework of other social sciences, such as sociology. His prize-winning research focused on investments in human capital, family/household behavior, crime and punishment and discrimination in markets.

Explaining 'Gary S. Becker'

Born in 1930 in Pennsylvania, Becker earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and numerous universities have awarded him honorary doctorate degrees. He taught at Columbia University before returning to the University of Chicago, to continue teaching in the departments of economics and sociology and in the business school. In addition to the Nobel Prize, Becker was awarded the John Bates Clark medal in 1967 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007.


Further Reading


Population and economic growth
pubs.aeaweb.org [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

The quantity and quality of life and the evolution of world inequalityThe quantity and quality of life and the evolution of world inequality
www.aeaweb.org [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

Human capital and the rise and fall of familiesHuman capital and the rise and fall of families
www.journals.uchicago.edu [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

Health as human capital: synthesis and extensionsHealth as human capital: synthesis and extensions
academic.oup.com [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

The family and the stateThe family and the state
www.journals.uchicago.edu [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

Public policies, pressure groups, and dead weight costsPublic policies, pressure groups, and dead weight costs
www.sciencedirect.com [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …

Deadweight costs and the size of governmentDeadweight costs and the size of government
www.journals.uchicago.edu [PDF]
The growth in the number of humans on this planet has a fascinating history (see Colin McEvedy and Richard Jones, 1978). There was negligible net growth during the first 100 or so million years of human habitation, a very low but persistent rate of growth to double the …


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