BROWSE

Joint Owned Property

What is 'Joint Owned Property'

Any property held in the name of two or more parties. The two parties could be a husband and wife, business partners or any other combination of people who have a reason to own property together. Property that is jointly owned may be held in one of several legal forms including joint tenancy, tenancy by the entirety, community property or in a trust.

Explaining 'Joint Owned Property'

Choosing the best form of ownership for joint property can greatly simplify things if one of the owners die. For example, joint tenancy is commonly used to avoid probate, a lengthy, costly and public process of distributing the deceased's assets in court.


Further Reading


Law, finance, and economic growth in China
www.sciencedirect.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

Effects of ownership and financial performance on corporate environmental performanceEffects of ownership and financial performance on corporate environmental performance
www.sciencedirect.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

Factors influencing intention to use diminishing partnership home financingFactors influencing intention to use diminishing partnership home financing
www.emerald.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

Economic reforms, efficiency and productivity in Chinese bankingEconomic reforms, efficiency and productivity in Chinese banking
link.springer.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

Law, finance, and economic growth in China: An introductionLaw, finance, and economic growth in China: An introduction
www.sciencedirect.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

Corporatisation and corporate governance in China's economic transitionCorporatisation and corporate governance in China's economic transition
link.springer.com [PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …

A Research on the Trust Property Ownership——The Construction of the Trust Property Joint-ownership <span style=[J]' src='/thumbnails/?img=http%3A%2F%2Fen.cnki.com.cn%2FArticle_en%2FCJFDTotal-XNJS201101024.htm' />A Research on the Trust Property Ownership——The Construction of the Trust Property Joint-ownership [J]
en.cnki.com.cn [[J]' href='https:/api.miniature.io/pdf?url=en.cnki.com.cn%2FArticle_en%2FCJFDTotal-XNJS201101024.htm'>PDF]
… affects the country's institutions, and how legal origin and institutions, both jointly and separately … First, we find that the equity ownership is concentrated within the State for firms … their start-up and subsequent periods are financial intermediaries, including state-owned banks and …



FAQ


What is property?

Property is what belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing. In the context of this article, it is one or more components (rather than attributes), whether physical or incorporeal, of a person's estate; or so belonging to, as in being owned by, a person or jointly a group of people or a legal entity like corporation or even society.

What are some examples of property?

Some examples include land and buildings; goods like clothing and furniture; intangible things such as patents and trademarks; services like taxi rides and hotel stays; rights such as copyrights and royalties; animals such as pets and livestock.

What does "own" mean when referring to property?

To own means to have legal title over property. This can be contrasted with having possession over something physically but not owning it legally. For example, if someone has been given the right to use another's car for several days but has no legal title over that car then he does not truly own it despite his possession over it. The same applies if he owns something but cannot use it because he lacks the legal right to do so e.g., if someone owns shares in company X but cannot sell them because they are subject under contract Y which forbids him from doing so then he does not really own those shares despite possessing them physically since he cannot exercise his ownership rights over them i.e., sell them freely on the market without violating contract Y which would violate law Z &91;1&93; .

How can you tell who owns something?

Ownership can be determined through many different ways depending on what type of property we are talking about &91;2&93;; however there are two main types that will be discussed here &91;; tangible vs intangible &91;;

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *